5 - 3 : Ita-jime


This dyeing method uses wooden boards as a resist. 'Ita' means board and 'jime' is from the verb 'shimeru' that means squeeze. To produce the pattern seen in the photo on the right, ita-jime is applied twice using different sizes of boards. The random and irregular stripes generated by this resist create very attractive patterns. This method is effectively used for long objects such as noren (shop curtains), scarves, tapestries, and dresses (like that in the picture) ...

This method is effectively used for long objects such as noren - a shop curtain, scarves, tapestry, and dress(like the picture) ...

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A long cloth is firmly wrapped around a series of boards and then pressed very tightly (photo on the left).

Delicate grooves on the surface of each board (photo below) allow the indigo-dye to pass through and make the striped patterns.

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The dyed cloth is carefully washed and hung out to dry.

1. Ito-zome 2. Shibori-zome 3. Ita-jime
4. Kata-zome 5. Tsutsu-gaki 'The dyeing process' top page